Anuradhapura is a major city in Sri Lanka. It is the capital city of North Central Province, Sri Lanka and the capital of Anuradhapura District. Anuradhapura is one of the ancient capitals of Sri Lanka, famous for its well-preserved ruins of an ancient Sri Lankan civilization. It was the third capital of the kingdom of Rajarata, following the kingdoms of Tambapanni and Upatissa Nuwara.

The city, now a World Heritage site, was the centre of Theravada Buddhism for many centuries. The city lies 205 km (127 mi) north of the current capital of Colombo in the North Central Province, on the banks of the historic Malvathu River. It is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world and one of the eight World Heritage Sites of Sri Lanka.

It is believed that from the fourth century BCE until the beginning of the 11th century CE it was the capital of the Sinhalese. During this period it remained one of the most stable and durable centres of political power and urban life in South Asia. The ancient city, considered sacred to the Buddhist world, is today surrounded by monasteries covering an area of over 16 square miles (41 km ).

Jaya Sri Maha Bodhi is a sacred g tree in the Mahamewna Gardens, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It is said to be the southern branch from the historical Sri Maha Bodhi at Buddha Gaya in India under which Lord Buddha attained Enlightenment. It was planted in 288 BC, and is the oldest living human-planted tree in the world with a known planting date.Today it is one of the most sacred relics of the Buddhists in Sri Lanka and respected by Buddhists all over the world.

Isurumuniya

Isurumuniya is a Buddhist temple situated near to the Tissa Wewa (Tisa tank) in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. There are four carvings of special interest in this Vihara. They are the Isurumuniya Lovers, Elephant Pond and The Royal Family

Samadhi Statue

The Samadhi Statue is a statue situated at Mahamevnāwa Park in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. The Buddha is depicted in the position of the Dhyana Mudra, the posture of meditation associated with his rst Enlightenment. Whether the Buddha’s Enlightenment was the experience technically called samadhi, or some other phenomenon, may depend upon the philosophical allegiance of the believer. In the Dhyana Mudra the Buddha sits cross-legged with his upturned palms placed one over the other on his lap. This position is universally known throughout the Buddhist world, and this statue is therefore one of the most typical pieces of Buddhist sculpture. It is not to be confused with the very similar “Earth-Touching Mudra,” which depicts the simple action the Buddha took to fend o the illusions projected by Mara, who was desperate to prevent the Buddha from realizing that his, Mara’s, projections, and with them the entire world, are an illusion. This statue is 8 feet in height and carved from granite

Kuttam Pokuna

One of the best specimen of bathing tanks or pools in ancient Sri Lanka is the pair of pools known as Kuttam Pokuna (Twin Ponds/Pools). The said pair of pools were built by the Sinhalese in the ancient kingdom of Anuradhapura. These are considered one of the signicant achievements in the eld of hydrological engineering and outstanding architectural and artistic creations of the ancient Sinhalese.

Ranmasu Uyana

Ranmasu Uyana is a park in Sri Lanka containing the ancient Magul Uyana (Royal Gardens). It is situated close to Isurumuni Vihara and Tissawewa in the ancient sacred city of Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. It sits on approximately 40 acres (16 ha), and is a noted example of Sri Lankan garden architecture of the pre-Christian era. According to an inscription found in Vessagiriya, the water to the park was supplied by Tessa Wewa and then released to rice elds around Isurumuni Vihara. In the park are various ponds, and the remains of small buildings. According to legend it is believed that Prince Saliya met Asokamala in this garden.

Dakkhina Stupa

Dakkhina Stupa is a 2nd-century BC large brick Stupa in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. The Stupa was identied to have been built to mark the site of cremation of King Dutugamunu (161 BC – 137 BC). The structure was identied in 1946 as Dakkhina Stupa by the eminent archaeologist Senarath Paranavithana. This structure was for centuries locally known as the tomb stone of king Ellalan, known as Elara Sohona, which was worshipped by Tamils and Sinhalese